ORANGES & LEMONS;Two women step to center stage in politics Orange County Register (California) June 25, 1993 Friday

 

Copyright 1993 Orange County Register  

Orange County Register (California)

 

June 25, 1993 Friday MORNING EDITION

 

SECTION: EDITORIAL; Pg. B10

 

LENGTH: 1091 words

 

HEADLINE: ORANGES & LEMONS;

Two women step to center stage in politics

 

BYLINE: Eldon Griffiths

 

BODY:

There's been an avalanche of comment on the emergence onto the

world scene of two formidable women: the new prime ministers of

Canada and Turkey.  Both strike me as pretty tough cookies (if

that's not a sexist label).  Kim Campbell, the blonde from British

Columbia, has as rough a tongue as any to be heard in the Canadian

House of Commons.  Tansu Ciller, the vivacious Turk who in one of

the most macho _ and Muslim _ of countries coaxed (or was it

cajoled?) her millionaire husband into accepting her surname

instead of his, is now top cat (there I go again!) in a country

that, despite its economic problems, seems well set to re-assert

its dominance in the crucial region where Europe and Asia converge.

 

But note one striking feature of both these new prime ministers.

 

Neither is a feminist.  Both assert the rights of women as

individuals, not as members of a group.  Isn't that why, as The Wall

Street Journal  so cogently pointed out, neither Campbell nor

Ciller has been received with anything like rapture by the feminist

movement?

 

In Canada, radical women's groups banded together to oppose Kim

Campbell's candidacy, despite her public advocacy of a women's

individual right to choose whether to bear an unwanted child.  Some

of these feminist outfits applied to Prime Minister Kim the same

offensive epithet that Gloria Steinem, the group-rights diva in

Washington, fired at this country's most recent woman to make the

big time, GOP Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison of Texas: "a female

impersonator     someone who looks like us but thinks like them"!

 

That of course is what the feminists used to say about Kim

Campbell's role model, Margaret Thatcher.  Who did more than the

Iron Lady to make us males understand _ and respect _ the vast

contribution that women can make to government and business, as

well as to the home?  Always a proud wife and mother, Thatcher never

wanted anything to do with group rights.  After bruising battles in

Parliament or at international summit conferences, there's nothing

she enjoys more than cooking her family breakfast or re-papering

the pantry shelves!

 

Tansu Ciller's elevation led Ankara newspapers to proclaim "The

whole world is now talking Turkey. " She is a symbol of a new

generation of Turks impatient for private enterprise, lower taxes,

and privatization.  With her soft-set hair and Chanel suits, she

dispels any notion that Turkey is about to return to the Islamic

fundamentalism that has set back women's rights in neighboring

Iran; yet like Kim Campbell and Thatcher, she, too, is impatient

with the anti-male approach of the feminist movement.  "I have been

charged with forming a government," she told Turkish television,

"but here in our home the father is head of the family. "

 

How's that for a putdown for Dame Steinem and Co.?

 

Remembering Pat Nixon:

 

I first met Pat Nixon when she was teaching school.  She and her

husband, a young ex-Navy lawyer then in his second term in the

House of Representatives, were living, as I recall, in a small

apartment over a garage somewhere in Whittier.  Her salary was

important to help cover their family expenses.  My job was to report

for Time magazine on Dick Nixon's rough-tough campaign against a

Democrat named Helen Gahagan Douglas for a seat in the U.S. Senate.

 

That was 40 years ago, and I spent only one day with them, but two

distinct impressions remain etched in my memory.

 

One was of candidate Nixon talking about Christian values to an

audience of Sunday-school teachers, then leaping into his car _ the

wooden-sided convertible now on display at the Richard Nixon

Library & Birthplace in Yorba Linda _ to drive to San Bernardino.

 

His audience there consisted mainly of railroad workers.  Nixon soon

had them laughing at some pretty blue _ offensive _ jokes about the

alleged sexual interest of his opponent!

 

Which brings me to my second recollection; of Pat Nixon

literally "tutting" as her husband left the platform.  Pat, you see,

was a lady, as well as an old-fashioned schoolteacher.  And in those

days, her sort of girl blushed when raunchy stories were told.

 

Nothing does President Nixon more credit than the support that

he, in turn, gave to his wife as she aged.  Without Pat he will be

an older and lonelier man, but he surely can take pride, and

perhaps find some comfort, too, in the fact that her "old-fashioned

values" kept them together: "for richer for poorer, in sickness and

in health, until death do us part. "

 

And finally, a word about another lady, a lady our new president

surely must have consulted when those stories broke about his

so-called half-brother turning up in Paradise.  She is Mrs. Virginia

Kelley.  Mrs. Virginia, as she likes to be called down Little Rock

way, admits to having been "a bit of a swinger" in her time but is

now quietly reported to live with her fifth husband in a pretty

little two-bedroom cottage, overlooking an Arkansas lake.

 

Interviewed not long ago by the London Times , she was wearing

"big glittery earrings and batting her false lashes" which, added

to the "white Indira Gandhi streak in her black hair and a handful

of rings," gave her (according to the Times ) "the look of a lady

psychic, about to read her Tarot cards. "

 

I wonder what future Mrs. Virginia sees in those Tarot cards for

William Jefferson Blythe IV, as she named the 42nd U.S. president

when he was born?

 

Sir Eldon Griffiths is president of the Orange County World

Affairs Council, a former member of the British House of Commons,

and director of the Center for  International Business at Chapman

University.  

 

LOAD-DATE: March 12, 1997